2022’s Best Cities for Farmers Markets in Winter Months

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Two young women at a farmers market during colder weather months

Winter can freeze farmers markets — from operating, that is — as the days get shorter in some parts of the country. Fortunately, many stay open so patrons can keep buying locally grown produce and unique goods all season long. 

So, which cities offer the best access to farmers markets between November and March?

Lawn Love compared 101 of the biggest U.S. cities to rank 2022’s Best Cities for Farmers Markets in Winter Months, separated by warm and cold climates.

We looked for walkable cities with good weather and, of course, plenty of winter markets to visit throughout the season. 

Use our rankings, in-depth analysis, and expert insights to make the most out of your next artisanal excursion. 

In this article

  1. Cold city rankings
  2. Warm city rankings
  3. Infographic: Cold vs. warm cities
  4. Results in depth
  5. Expert take
  6. Methodology
  7. Final thoughts: Local market landmarks

Cold city rankings 

See how each city fared in our ranking:

Warm city rankings 

See how each warm city fared in our ranking:

Infographic: Cold vs. warm cities

infographic depicting a map and percentages of the best cities for winter farmers markets
Note: A total of 17 cities tied for first place in Number of Very Cold Days. However, only five are shown in the above infographic for presentation purposes.

Results in depth

Freezing festivities 

A chill in the air won’t stop residents in cold cities from braving the weather to support their local farmers markets. 

New York takes the top spot in our cold cities ranking. In the Big Apple, there are plenty of winter markets to walk to, giving New Yorkers a chance to make the big city feel small by connecting with farmers, artisans, and other members of their community.

Following close behind is Portland, Oregon (No. 2), unsurprising due to the city’s vibrant communities, commitment to sustainability, and award-winning artisanal goods like beer

Philadelphia (No. 3) is even more walkable and has been loving its local farmers and artisans for more than a century

Local tip: NYC’s iconic Union Square Greenmarket is open year-round, four days a week, bringing fresh food, flowers, and more to the heart of Manhattan. Frequented by more than 60,000 customers per day, this is one of the most popular farmers markets in the country. 

In Portland, stop by People’s Farmers’ Market — the longest-running market in the city that operates year-round — to see live music, watch cooking demos, and get to know your neighbors. 

Trendy and tropical tastes

Cities with tropical climates have a big advantage when it comes to fresh produce: Their growing season never ends. 

Sunny Los Angeles (No. 1) tops our warm cities ranking. The city boasts plenty of markets with unique stalls selling items like thrifted clothes, vintage records, and used books. Los Angeles’ abundance of markets and high walkability earned the city a 10-point lead on the next warm city.

The island of Oahu is known as “The Gathering Place,” so it’s no wonder that its main city, Honolulu (No. 2), has plenty of opportunities to gather at neighborhood farmers markets. Honolulu’s markets offer fresh fruit you won’t find in most other city markets, such as guava, breadfruit, and longan. 

Almost 5,000 miles away, Miami takes third place, with local farmers selling fresh vegetables in the sun all winter long. 

Local tip: With origins dating back to 1880, L.A.’s Original Farmers Market is open daily year-round. During the holiday season, the market holds special winter events like live music, comedy, and crafting.

At the Honolulu Farmers Market, you can find a diverse range of foods sourced from ingredients grown right in Hawaii, including Hawaiian-style chili, hibachi, boba, takoyaki balls, and more. 

Walking in a winter wonderland

Pedestrian-friendly cities pave a smooth path toward the farmers markets in our cold cities ranking, where most of the top 10 cities also scored in the top 10 for walkability.

Though patrons might need to bundle up, residents of top-ranking cities like Washington, D.C. (No. 4), Chicago (No. 5), and Providence, Rhode Island (No. 6), can easily stroll to winter markets in their area. 

By prioritizing walker-friendly infrastructure, these cities encourage their residents to lead a healthier, more active lifestyle, which is especially important in colder seasons when people tend to stay indoors more often. 

Local tip: In D.C., stop by Eastern Market, a historic public market built into the original city plans that has been operating since 1873. Operating both indoors and outdoors, you can find a variety of produce, prepared foods, and artisanal goods year-round. 

Chicago’s Green City Market has some of the strictest guidelines for vendor sustainability in the U.S., making it a trusted and beloved market for environmentally conscious Chicagoans.

In Providence, stay cozy by visiting the Farm Fresh Providence Farmers Market, an indoor market on the edge of the Woonasquatucket River designed to allow customers to keep their distance and stay safe during the pandemic. 

Coasting through the markets

Walkability doesn’t seem to be as much of a concern for warmer cities like Houston (No. 4), San Diego (No. 5), or San Antonio (No. 6). 

These cities placed higher than some of the more pedestrian-friendly cities like New Orleans (No. 23). Houston and San Antonio pulled ahead, thanks to their high number of farmers markets, while San Diego got a boost from its lovely weather.

All three cities are booming in population and have each begun to take steps to improve pedestrian access. Houston has a Walkable Places Committee, San Diego is implementing Pedestrian Area Plans, and San Antonio created an ongoing SA Tomorrow Comprehensive Plan

Local tip: Houston’s weekly Urban Harvest Farmers Market brings in more than 100 vendors from within a 180-mile radius of the city limits. Urban Harvest also organizes a community garden program and hosts gardening education and certification programs. 

Each week, San Diego’s Little Italy Mercato fills six blocks downtown with stalls selling fresh produce, gourmet olive oil, and artisanal bread.

Pearl Farmers Market is a beloved local spot in San Antonio. Hosted outside of The Pearl, a former brewery, all vendors operate within 150 miles of the city, giving the market a uniquely Texan flair.

Expert take

While the harvest season may end in autumn, people still need to eat, and farmers still have bills to pay. But what are the other benefits of keeping farmers markets open through the winter? We turned to some experts to find out: 

  1. What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?
  2. What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?
  3. What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?
  4. What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?
  5. What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?
Dr. Audrey Guskey
Professor
Subbu Kumarappan, PhD
Associate Professor
Dawn Thilmany McFadden
Co-Director, CSU Regional Economic Development Institute, Professor, Ag and Resource Economics
Luke Gocke
Instructor
Wandra Arrington, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
Rebekka Dudensing, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Extension Economist – Community Economic Development, Department of Agricultural Economics
Dr. Audrey Guskey
Professor
Duquesne University

What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?

  1. Farmers markets provide fresh, healthy, clean food options to their community. Many times farmers will educate shoppers regarding how to prepare the food, the vitamins and minerals in each vegetable/fruit, and the health benefits of the food.
  2. By shopping at your local farmers market, it keeps the money in the local community, which benefits everyone.
  3. Farmers markets are a fun, family-friendly, lively place to be which enhances any community.

What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?

  1. Most fruits, vegetables, and prepared food at a farmers market is cheaper than at a supermarket
  2. The produce bought at a farmers market is fresher. Many times it is picked the same day.
  3. It is convenient because it is located within a community.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?

Although much more limited in the variety of offerings as compared to spring and summer months, winter farmers markets offer interesting selections and keep the community vibrant and healthy.

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

  1. It provides income for the farmers all year round.
  2. It provides healthy, fresh foods for shoppers throughout the winter months.
  3. It is a safe, fun, family-friendly place to go in the wintertime.

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?

Baked goods, wine and spirits, crafts, flowers and plants, herbs and seasonings, honey and jams, dairy products such as milk and cheese.

Subbu Kumarappan, PhD
Associate Professor
Ohio State University

What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?

One of the great benefits of shopping at the farmers market is the customers’ ability to create direct and personal connections with the farmers. I have seen and heard customers shopping at the farmers market ask more about the production practices and who are all involved in their farm (often the farm families). Creating that meaningful connection with the customers is accomplished in any direct marketing settings, especially farmers markets.

I personally have been okay to pay the price premiums when I hear more about the background of the producers and that I can trust the farmer selling the food. This unique opportunity is not available while shopping at the traditional grocery stores.

The direct marketing outlets that bring farmers together (such as Local Roots in Wooster, OH, West Side Market in Cleveland) – all have these unique benefits and encourage fresh produce consumption and thus promoting the health of the consumers.

Consumer Supported Agriculture (CSA) are another important aspect of farmers markets; in one CSA, I even provided my time to help harvest and package items which have resulted in some good friendships and camaraderie.

What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?

The freshness, the ability to know where and how the foods were produced, and a more meaningful and emotional connection to the foods that we eat.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?

In Ohio, many farm stands or farmers markets cease operations by October or November. So, the consumers have to be prepared for a short season. Some farms use hoop houses and greenhouse production which extend their seasons.

I have shopped in a farmers market where some farmers were selling cheap produce that was directly taken off a refrigerated truck that crossed multiple state boundaries. It is relevant (and important for some) to inquire if their foods are local or imported from other states or regions.

Consumers should really know that they are supporting small farm businesses – many refugees and immigrant families try to make a living by producing and selling vegetables and fruits; the consumer dollars directly support these small family businesses to varying degrees.

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

Additional revenues from the farm stands is a welcome thing for any farmer who has already invested in the farm. Unique cold season crops can be continually brought to the markets. The consumers continue to eat healthy vegetables and fruits, supplemented with foods from other U.S. states and countries.

There have been concerted efforts to convert an open lot of farmers markets into climate controlled structures to continue the economic activity which is good for the local economy.

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?

Unique items such as straw figures made out of corn stover at the end of the harvesting season have captured my attention. Some seasonal fruits such as persimmons are available only in Nov-Dec. Often they are not locally produced in Ohio. Processed foods such as pickle bottles are available in both colder and warmer seasons.

Dawn Thilmany McFadden
Co-Director, CSU Regional Economic Development Institute, Professor, Ag and Resource Economics
Colorado State University

What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?

  1. They provide a “testing ground” for new farms and food businesses to learn about the market.
  2. They keep food dollars and jobs more closely linked to the community.
  3. They increase the diversity and freshness of foods available to communities.

What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?

  1. Unique offerings
  2. Supporting their neighbors/local businesses
  3. Often they may learn how to use a new ingredient in their cooking.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?

That many products are seasonal, so you may not get all you expect. But, it is a good time to experiment with new products (root vegetables) and meet new food businesses (bakers, cheesemakers, beverages).

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

  1. A more stable marketplace for farms and food businesses that have year-round offerings.
  2. Keeps consumers in the habit of shopping from local vendors
  3. Has allowed meat producers to really grow their presence in markets

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?

Beverages, root crops and winter vegetables, winter greens (many think they are only a summer crop), and specialty baked goods.

Luke Gocke
Instructor
College of Western Idaho

What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?

Farmers markets offer many benefits to local farmers and communities.

One benefit is farmers markets provide an opportunity for consumers to purchase fresh, local, and nutritious food. There is a growing trend with consumers to know their farmer, where their food comes from, and have food that is produced with a particular set of standards. Farmers markets provide that type of food for consumers.

Second, it offers farmers the ability to market, sell, and contribute to the local economy. You don’t see large corporations or big businesses in these markets so it’s a great opportunity for smaller businesses to grow their operations.

Lastly, farmers markets contribute to the culture, comradery, and life of a community.

What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?

One of the remarkable things about American Farmers is they provide food in a variety of ways for all types of consumers. Consumers represent a vast group and each one has their own particular reasons for the diet they choose to eat. Farmers Markets are a unique and traditional aspect of how food goes from farm to fork. Three reasons why you should buy from a farmers market are:

  1. Food is produced and sold seasonally which adds to its freshness and flavor. Remember when food was only available during the season it was grown? That is still alive and well at farmers markets.
  2. Food is local meaning it comes from farmers who live in your community. There aren’t any storage or long trips for these products to travel.
  3. There is a minimal amount of processing if any at all. More often than not, local farmers markets have produce that is raised with minimal use of pesticides, herbicides, and other production methods that might be more present in a supermarket.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?

One aspect to keep in mind is that the available items during the winter will look different than what you’re used to in the other seasons. For example, popular items like corn, squash, zucchini, tomatoes, peppers, and melons are all good crops to grow in warmer weather so those might not be available or as available during winter.

Also, some farmers might shut down during winter for a variety of reasons so your favorite booth at the market might be empty until the season changes.

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

Winter farmers markets prolong the ability for consumers to have local fresh produce year around. It allows farmers an opportunity to market their products and create more income for their business and families.

Farmers markets in winter time, with the multiple holidays, offer a location in the community for winter events and bringing the community together. Oftentimes, communities have less events for families when it’s cold and winter farmers markets allow families an opportunity to engage with their community.

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?

Obviously, there might be seasonally minded products that reflect the holidays. You will see more Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s related products and items. There still might be some availability of stone fruits, lots of leafy green vegetables should be available, broccoli, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts are others that might be popular.

There are some factors that will affect this, like how cold does your community get and how soon does that freezing weather come? Definitely some different options compared to warm season farmers markets that make it fun to see the varied products.

Wandra Arrington, PhD
Assistant Professor, School of Agriculture and Applied Sciences
Alcorn State University

What are the top three ways farmers’ markets benefiting their communities?

1. Support the local economy. Many farms in the area are within 100 miles of the farmers’ market. This means more local jobs and money is going back to your community.

2. Support family farmers. Family farms have decreased over the years because of high costs and bigger competitors. By buying from farmers markets, you are helping to support those local family farms, giving them the capital they need to continue providing fresh produce for your family.

3. Protect the environment. Food in the USA travels an average of 1,500 miles to get to your plate! This means increased use of fuels that pollute the environment.

Not only that, but many big-box farms also use pesticides, chemical fertilizers, and processing equipment that can contribute to environmental decay. When you buy locally, your food not only travels shorter distances but is typically grown using methods that minimize the impact on the earth.

Local farmers do not package or transport their goods as far either. That means they do not have to worry about unhealthy preservatives; natural ones will do just fine when they’re necessary.

What are three reasons why consumers should buy from farmers markets over their local supermarket?

1. Farmers Markets offers fresh local food

The fruits and vegetables are picked at the peak of their growing season, meaning this produce is the freshest and the tastiest available.

Local food is usually harvested at the peak of its ripeness cycle. While grocery and store-bought foods may have been picked at the opportune time as well, they still have to be packaged and transported to wherever they are being sold. Sometimes, this means they have to be transported across the country, maybe even the world. Local foods, however, do not have far to go.

Most markets set limitations on how far sellers and farmers can travel to participate. This is to keep competition healthy and fair, but also to protect the consumers. Local food that is picked at the right time and does not have to travel far will be riper than store-bought food.

2. Farmers Markets offers more of a variety

Supermarkets and food chains, on the other hand, carry foods year-round, even out of season. But this also means the food they carry is often not as ripe or fresh. Nor was it produced in optimal conditions.

But in reality, farmers markets offer so much more variety. Even though in a general sense the available foods may be less, you have so many more options.

Apples, for instance, different stalls or vendors may carry different kinds of apples, and even when they have matching types they may have been grown or produced differently, so they’ll look different and maybe even taste a bit different.

3. Local Farms Are Not Industrial and Do Not Mass Produce Foods

The farms and suppliers of grocery stores and food chains grow their crops on a large scale. Because they have to worry about efficiency and total yield, they often don’t grow different crops together in the same field. This is referred to as a “monoculture” and is often more susceptible to disease and pests.

Worse yet, how they have used monoculture setups often sap the surrounding soil and earth of the necessary nutrients needed to grow certain foods or plants. This means the food produced is often of lower quality. Not to mention, the setup is harder on the environment and land requiring more unnatural chemicals, pesticides, and fertilizers to be used.

It is not difficult to guess what kind of impact this has on the environment, let alone the food that is being produced.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers’ markets during the winter?

While fewer in number, winter farmers markets serve as important a role as their summer counterparts, maintaining access to fresh, healthy, and local food. Winter farmers markets are traditionally held indoors to protect farmers, shoppers, and products from the often-harsh weather in the winter months.

Based on a 2014 article by Ivanka, John D for the Hobby Farms online magazine. Winter farmers’ markets are increasing in number around the country, growing more than 50 percent of the total crop annually. Winter markets now account for roughly 25 percent of the markets listed in the USDA national directory.

Fresh, local produce can seem scarce in the winter. Though many farmers markets close in the winter months, some markets will continue to operate even after the growing seasons have ended. Winter farmers markets not only bring fresh food to the communities they serve but also allow farmers to continue building rapport with their customers.

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers’ markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

1. Stay open through cold months

Traditional farmers markets usually run from early spring to late fall, but there is a growing trend popping up in cities across the country: the winter farmers’ market.

Winter farmers’ markets stay open through cold months to offer the buyers delicious local food, drinks, and crafts. This means no matter the weather, you can still shop in comfort for your favorite offerings.

Also, winter farmers markets are open for business to feed their communities during the darker months of the year.

2. Community Gathering

The purpose of a farmers market is to help connect local farmers and producers with the community, as a source of great seasonal offerings.

Farmers’ markets are a place for people to find fresh produce as well as other local goods but it is also a space for people to gather and be community-oriented.

Winter farmers markets are often more than just farm-fresh produce and things that are grown in the ground. There will likely be offerings and wares for sale by local artisans and makers. Purchasing items at a winter farmers market allows you to feel great knowing you are supporting the livelihood of local growers and producers.

3. Food Access in the Winter

Your winter farmers market will not have the same options as the markets held in spring and summer. This is mainly because those fruits and vegetables are not being grown or harvested during colder months.

Winter farmers’ markets serve as important a role as their summer counterparts, maintaining access to fresh, healthy, local food. Access to farm-fresh products during the winter and early spring months is especially important because it is at farmers markets that residents can access their SNAP/EBT benefits. SNAP/EBT shoppers can buy local fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the cold months.

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally would not find during the warmer seasons?

During the winter holidays, the winter farmers’ markets focus on stocking up for Thanksgiving and getting an early start on holiday food gifts.

At winter farmers’ markets, there are usually more vendors selling value-added products than selling fresh fruits and vegetables. As with all the farmers’ markets, the produce will vary with location but most farmers sell produce from their fall storage. Root crops like turnips, beets, rutabaga, carrots, and potatoes will be available, as well as onions, garlic, leeks, and varieties of squash.

Other farmers who have invested in greenhouses will have some cold-hardy greens like kale, spinach, arugula, Swiss chard, microgreens, and sprouts. Mushroom vendors are also popular at winter markets.

Often a winter farmers’ market is a great place to find things like local honey, spices, and jams or preserves. Since these types of items are usually canned or dried, they have a longer shelf-life. You might also see cut flowers or winter plants. Depending on the type, winter is often a good time for planting. Some farmers also sell or swap their seeds, especially heirloom varieties, so make the most of this opportunity to stock up for your spring and summer garden.

Winter farmers’ markets are often more than just farm-fresh produce and things that are grown in the ground. There will be offerings and wares for sale by local artisans and makers. From handcrafted jewelry and pottery to unique and one-of-a-kind art or woodworking. Other items you might find include essential oils, handmade soaps and lotions, and natural cosmetics.

The farmers markets have become a critical ingredient to our nation’s economy, food systems, and communities. Connecting rural to the urban, farmer to consumer, and fresh ingredients to our diets, farmers’ markets are becoming economic and community centerpieces in both cities and towns across the U.S.

As of today, there are over 8,000 markets listed in our National Farmers Market Directory, demonstrating the continuous demand for these community-oriented markets and the many contributions they make to their local economies.

Visit and support your local farmers market. Try new foods and enjoy the wonderful, fresh produce they offer. Watch as your children and others learn more about the food they eat and where it comes from. They benefit local farmers, vendors, neighbors, and the community.

Rebekka Dudensing, Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Extension Economist – Community Economic Development, Department of Agricultural Economics
Texas A&M University

What are the top three ways farmers markets benefit their communities?

Farmers markets:

  1. Make fresh food to the community, often accepting SNAP benefits,
  2. Allow eaters to get to know their farmers and ask questions about how their food is produced, and
  3. Provide an event where people from different backgrounds can come together—there are often artisans selling crafts and fun things going on in addition to great food.

What should consumers know about shopping at farmers markets during the winter?

Different crops grow in different seasons in different parts of the country. Some farmers do have hot houses, but you probably won’t be able to get strawberries in December. There are wonderful products that are perfect for winter meals. Use your common sense too. I once worked for farmers who sold bananas at their farmers market booth. They were not locally grown, even though much of the produce was grown on their farm.

On the other hand, in places like Texas, it may be more pleasant to be out at the market in mild January weather than in the August heat.

What are the top three benefits of keeping farmers markets operating through the winter to farmers, consumers, and/or the local economy?

Farmers also need income all year. Consumers often need time to remember the farmers market schedule, and staying open through winter keeps the market on their minds. There tends to be fewer community activities in the post-holiday winter and early spring months; farmers markets provide an outdoor opportunity to participate in the community.

What kinds of products (or potential gifts) might consumers find at winter farmers markets that they normally wouldn’t find during the warmer seasons?

I tend to think of amazing greens, squashes, root vegetables like carrots and turnips, broccoli, brussels sprouts, as well as tomatoes, eggs, meats, honey, and, of course, pecans (here in Texas). You can also get your pies and other desserts along with gifts like soaps, jewelry, and, wow, just lots of great stuff.

Methodology

We ranked 101 of the biggest U.S. cities, split into cold cities and warm cities, determined by the mildness of their states’ winters.

Cold cities were ranked from best to worst (1-60), as were warm cities (1-41), based on their overall scores (out of 100 points), averaged across the weighted metrics listed below. 

For the Winter Farmers Markets data, we counted USDA-registered farmers markets operating at least once between November and March. The USDA directory relies on self-reported information from farmers market managers, and therefore may not include all farmers markets in the city that operate during winter.

Access

  • Winter Farmers Markets (Weight: 3)

Walkability

  • Walk Score (Weight: 2)

Climate

  • Average Rain (Inches) in Winter (Weight: 1)
  • Number of Very Cold Days in Winter (Weight: 1)
  • Average Sunshine in Winter (Weight: 1)

Sources

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Walk Score

Final thoughts: Local market landmarks

Don’t go into hibernation this winter — get some fresh air and food by visiting your local farmers market. 

Learn about seasonal fruits and vegetables, find unique artisanal goods, and experience something new. Many farmers markets host unique events, such as live music and cooking demonstrations, which aren’t available at most local supermarkets.

If your local farmers market is lackluster at best, why not take a trip to an iconic farmers market near you? Here’s what you’ll find at some of America’s most notable farmers markets:

  • Seattle, Washington: In 1907, Pike Place Market opened as the first farmers market in Seattle and has since risen to landmark status. Many know of it as the place where Starbucks originated, but to Seattleites, Pike Place is so much more. Open daily throughout the year, Pike Place Market is a space for finding fresh food, artisanal goods, art, and community events, including holiday season kickoff, Magic in the Market.
  • Cleveland, Ohio: West Side Market has become a significant landmark in Cleveland since its humble beginnings as a street market in 1840. The market’s iconic clock tower was built in 1912, and the site was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
  • Madison, Wisconsin: The Dane County Farmers’ Market is the largest producer-only farmers market in the country, meaning that every product for sale has been grown or made in Wisconsin by the vendor selling it. This makes it easy for farmers to connect with their customers, and for consumers to access information about what they’re buying directly from the source. 
  • Detroit, Michigan: The historic Eastern Market has origins dating back to 1841, and the Eastern Market Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The market occupies more than 43 acres of space, and is home to the largest open-air flowerbed market in America. 
  • Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Lancaster was officially designated a “market town” by King George II in 1742, but the city’s Central Market has a history dating back even further to the 1730s. Central Market is the oldest continually operating farmers market in the United States. If you get the chance to go, be sure to check out Stoner’s Homegrown Vegetables, a market stand that’s been operating for more than a century.

Main Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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